Saturday, November 27, 2010

The King's General

By Daphne du Maurier

Inspired by a grisly discovery in the nineteenth century, The King's General was the first of du Maurier's novels to be written at Menabilly, the model for Manderley in Rebecca. Set in the seventeenth century, it tells the story of a country and a family riven by war, and features one of fiction's most original heroines.

Honor Harris is only eighteen when she first meets Richard Grenvile, proud, reckless - and utterly captivating. But following a riding accident, Honor must reconcile herself to a life alone. As Richard rises through the ranks of the army, marries and makes enemies, Honor remains true to him, and finally discovers the secret of Menabilly.

(Above taken from here).

This was among a stack of audiobooks my Nan was given, which she then gave to me. It was a really good book. I was first introduced to Daphne du Maurier's work when I read Rebecca as part of a writing course I did about 8 years ago. I really enjoyed that book too. And, despite only having read two of her books, I think Daphne du Maurier is a fantastic author. If the two books I have read are anything to go by, then I think I'm justified in my opinion of her writing.

7 comments:

AliceKay said...

I'm glad you enjoyed the audio book. That was nice of your Nan to give it to you. :)

Hope you're having a good Saturday.

Toriz said...

AK:
My Nan often gives me audiobooks. We also often borrow each others audiobooks to listen to them.


Yeah, my Saturday's not been too bad. Hope yours has been a good one.

Rita said...

Sounds interesting. I enjoy period pieces and historical novels. :)

Deanna said...

That definitely sounds like an interesting book.

Toriz said...

Rita:
Then you'll enjoy Daphne Du Maurier's work.

Deanna:
It is. :)

Intense Guy said...

Sounds a bit like "The English Patient" which I thoroughly enjoyed. I like some historically "close to accurate" sagas too - Ken Follett for one - but it would take a brave and high endurance reader to make his stuff audio books - at a 1000 pages or more each book.

Toriz said...

Iggy:
Yeah... That would take more disks than the Harry Potter books. And some of them are more than a dozen CDs long!